Study Information about Sydney Olympic Park

White-bellied Sea-Eagles - 2020

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Click on a Graphic to see a larger view

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BirdLife Southern NSW, EagleCAM research team Judy Harrington, Geoff Hutchinson, Jon Irvine.

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Delayed Incubation at the EagleCAM Nest 2019 and 2020

 

Summary :

As in previous years, the White-bellied Sea-Eagles have shown delayed incubation between the laying of the two eggs. The eggs were laid some 73 hours apart in 2019 and 82 hours apart in 2020. Once the second egg was laid, full incubation continued both years. It is expected that as in 2019, the second egg in 2020 will hatch closer to the first, as a result of the delayed incubation of the first egg. The second younger chick may then have a chance to “catch up” with the bigger stronger first-hatched chick.

2019 :

Egg 1 SE-23 was laid in the early evening. That first night, even with June cold weather, the female incubated for only 5 hours, leaving the egg uncovered for 5:30. As usually it is the female incubating at night, it was unusual to see that the male incubated for over 2 hours, after 3:00am, possibly due to disturbance nearby.
The next day, both shared daytime egg duty, with the egg uncovered for over 4 hours.
On the second night she again left the egg uncovered, for nearly 6 hours.
Daytime incubation and care at the nest continued to be shared by both adults. As lay of the second egg approached, incubation time increased until the second egg SE-24 was laid .
Full incubation of both eggs then continued, with the female incubating at night, assisted by the male during the day.

2019 Number of hours the first egg was uncovered during Incubation before laying of egg 2

graph-1 Graph 1 :
Egg 1 was uncovered nearly 13 hours total at night and nearly 9 hours by day before egg 2 was laid.
Eggs laid 73 hours apart.

 

 

 

 

2019 Daytime Incubation between egg SE-23 and egg SE-24

graph-3 Graph 3 :
During the day, both adults incubated, with the female a total of 23 hours and the male nearly 27 hours.
The egg was uncovered nearly 9 hours during the day.

 

 

 

 

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2020 :

The first egg SE-25 was laid in the morning. During that day 1 the female incubated only 1:45 and the male 4:40 . The egg was uncovered 2 hours during that first day. However the first night, the egg was uncovered almost all the cold June night.
The next day both again shared incubation duty, with the egg uncovered some 4:20.
On the second night the egg was uncovered for over 8 hours. Again, incubation time increased as lay of the second egg SE-26 approached.
Full incubation then continued, with the male assisting during the day and the female incubating at night.

2020 Number of hours the first egg was uncovered during incubation before lay of egg 2

graph-1 Graph 2 :
Egg 1 was uncovered over 21 hours total at night and nearly 10 hours by day before egg 2 was laid.
Eggs laid 82 hours apart.

 

 

 

 

2020 Daytime Incubation between egg SE-25 and egg SE-26

graph-4 Graph 4 :
During the day, both adults incubated, with the female a total of 16 hours and the male 19 hours.
The egg was uncovered nearly 10 hours during the day.

 

 

 

 

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(Ref: https://www.environment.nsw.gov.au/threatenedspeciesapp/profile.aspx?id=20322

Acknowledgements :

The EagleCAM research project team acknowledges the assistance of Sydney Olympic Park Authority in approving this research and facilitating access to the Nature Reserve and other facilities.
We acknowledge the essential assistance from the EagleCAM team, Judy Harrington, Geoff Hutchinson, Bob Oomen and Chris Bruce, for camera installation and maintenance and all things technical and Shirley McGregor for managing the daily operations. Special thanks to Dasha, Marsha and Pat, for monitoring/nesting observations and Dasha & Helen for camera operations. Additionally, we also have a wonderful team of volunteers including Facebook admins, chat moderators, ground observers and more (too many to mention here). Above all, thank you to our Supporters, for funding this project.

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